Snakes at the Lake

I’ve done a variety of things in my life as a job. Fast food employee, warehouse worker, grocery store shelf stocker, golf caddy, corn detasseler. And, this past week, I pursued gainful employment as a snake catcher. On the islands out in Lake Erie (of which there are a dozen or more, ranging from very small to moderately large), there are garter snakes. This is the same innocuous and handsome species that occurs throughout much of North America, the eastern garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis). The especially interesting thing about the Lake Erie garter snakes is that there is a color variant in many areas in and around the lake that is all black (melanistic, see photo).

Melanistic eastern garter snake.
Melanistic eastern garter snake.

Riley Moreau (’20) and I were catching these garter snakes to get DNA samples so we could work in the lab this fall to assess genetic differences among the color morphs, islands and other quantities that one can estimate with modern genetic tools. We found garter snakes on all islands we visited but one. On Middle Bass Island, we had spent about five hours searching with only one snake to show for it and then in the last ten minutes before our ferry departed we caught five more. When it rains, it pours.

Playing Hooky

Trillium in flower
Trillium in flower

A beautiful spring day this morning and instead of staring at a mountain of email in my office, I went out to Wooster Memorial Park. The fresh air and sunshine did me good. Trees are leafing out, migratory birds are returning and red-back salamanders are out and ready to be measured!

Red-backed salamander being weighed
Red-backed salamander being weighed

Two more new species of Guibemantis (one named after the College of Wooster)!

Recently, two colleagues and I described two more new species in the frog genus Guibemantis. This brings the total number of species in the genus to thirteen, more than doubling the known diversity in this group in less than ten years. One species from Marojejy National Park (Guibemantis woosteri), we named after The College of Wooster, my professional home. Go Scots!